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1 edition of A study of the association of HIV Infection with wealth in Sub-Saharan Africa found in the catalog.

A study of the association of HIV Infection with wealth in Sub-Saharan Africa

Vinod Mishra

A study of the association of HIV Infection with wealth in Sub-Saharan Africa

by Vinod Mishra

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  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Macro International in Calverton, MD .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Statistics,
  • AIDS (Disease)

  • Edition Notes

    StatementVinod Mishra ... [et al.].
    SeriesDHS working papers -- no. 31
    ContributionsUnited States. Agency for International Development
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRA643.86.A357 S78 2007
    The Physical Object
    Pagination67 p. ;
    Number of Pages67
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24894739M
    LC Control Number2010478254

      Systematic review exploring time trends in the association between educational attainment and risk of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. AIDS, Vol. 22, Issue. 3, p. fifteen found no association between SES and HIV infection, twelve found an association between high SES and HIV infection, eight found an association between low SES and Cited by: household wealth and HIV infection prevalence in the United Republic of Tanzania.4 Chin, who analysed data from Kenya, also showed that national HIV prevalence rates appeared to correlate directly with national income across sub-Saharan Af-rica5 – a trend noticed as early as .

    The association between school attendance, HIV infection and sexual behaviour among young people; in rural South Africa J R Hargreaves,1,2 L A Morison, 1J C Kim,1,2 C P Bonell,1 J D H Porter, C.   Clark, S. () Early marriage and HIV risks in sub-Saharan Africa. Studies in Family Plann – Fortson, J. () The gradient in sub-Saharan Africa: socioeconomic status and HIV Cited by: 5.

    Sub-Saharan Africa Overall HIV Trends Sub-Saharan Africa continues to bear an inordinate share of the global HIV burden, though epidemics across countries in Africa vary considerably: million people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) live in the region, representing about 68 percent of the total worldwide. The number of new infections inFile Size: KB. individuals in sub-Saharan Africa have an increased risk of being infected with HIV. A smaller body of literature exists on remarried individuals, and it contains little that describes the level of risk of HIV infection. Increased risk for being HIV-positive among those who are separated, divorced, or widowed is well docu mented.


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A study of the association of HIV Infection with wealth in Sub-Saharan Africa by Vinod Mishra Download PDF EPUB FB2

HIV studies from sub-Saharan Africa showed a significant relationship between risk of HIV infection and high socioeconomic status and a history of travel (Van de Perre et al. ; Barongo et al. In sub-Saharan Africa, household wealth tends to be associated with urban residence and HIV prevalence tends to be higher in urban areas.

A study of the association of HIV infection with wealth in sub-Saharan Africa. Wealth is measured by an index based on household ownership of durable assets and other amenities. This study finds that, contrary to evidence for other infectious diseases and theoretical expectations, in sub-Saharan Africa HIV prevalence is not disproportionately higher.

Objectives HIV infection has been associated with an impaired lung function in high-income countries, but the association between HIV infection and pulmonary function in Sub-Saharan Africa remains unclear.

This study aims to investigate the relation between HIV infection and pulmonary function in a rural African population. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV-positive and Author: Meri R.

Varkila, Alinda G. Vos, Alinda G. Vos, Roos E. Barth, Hugo A. Tempelman, Walter L. Dev. This paper investigates whether community-level wealth inequalitypredicts HIV serostatus, using DHS household survey and HIV biomarker data formen and women ages pooled from six sub-Saharan African countries with HIVprevalence rates exceeding five percent.

The analysis relates the binarydependent variable HIV positive serostatus and two weighted aggregate predictorsgenerated from the DHS Wealth Cited by: 9. The current study used micro- meso- and macro-level data from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) across regions within sixteen countries in sub-Saharan Africa to test the hypothesis that socioeconomic inequality, adjusted for absolute wealth, Cited by: The Disproportionate High Risk of HIV Infection Among the Urban Poor in Sub-Saharan Africa Monica A.

Magadi Published online: 4 June The Author(s) This article is published with open access at Abstract The link between HIV infection and poverty in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is rather complex and findingsCited by:   The link between HIV infection and poverty in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is rather complex and findings from previous studies remain inconsistent.

While some argue that poverty increases vulnerability, existing empirical evidence largely support the view that wealthier men and women have higher prevalence of HIV. In this paper, we examine the association between HIV infection and Cited by: directly with national income across sub-Saharan Africa5 – a trend noticed as early as More recently, Mishra et al.

analysed HIV infection prevalence by wealth group with national survey data for eight African countries (Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, the United Republic of Tanzania and Uganda) and.

Mapping the spatial variability of HIV infection in Sub-Saharan Africa: Effective information for localized HIV prevention and control. Diego F. Cuadros 1,2,Cited by:   The study hopes to clarify the above mixed results reported on the link between socio-economic inequality and HIV in South Africa.

Data source. The study used data from the South African National HIV prevalence, incidence, behaviour and communication survey.

This is a cross-sectional population-based household survey conducted every 3–4 Cited by:   HIV/AIDS is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa 1, the nearly four decades since HIV was first recognized, scientific breakthroughs have transformed the once Cited by: This systematic review of the relationship between transactional sex and HIV is a part of a larger comprehensive review assessing the state of knowledge on transactional sex in sub‐Saharan Africa including its conceptualization, definition and measurement as well as its association with HIV and related risk behaviours.

The comprehensive search strategy was broad to accommodate these multiple aims and includes studies Cited by: The estimated prevalence of HIV infection among the 74 million people aged ≥ 50 years in sub-Saharan Africa is %, compared with % among those aged 15–49 years.

Table 1. Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among adults aged ≥ 50 years (older adults) and people aged 15–49 years in sub-Saharan Africa, by country, Separated, divorced, and widowed individuals in Africa are at significantly increased risk for HIV infection. Using nationally representative data from 13 sub‐Saharan African countries, this study confirms that finding and goes further by examining those who have experienced a marital dissolution and are now by: The positive wealth-HIV gradient observed in this research supports recent evidence by (e.g.,) using DHS data from 8 sub-Saharan African countries demonstrating wealth as an important driver of HIV infections in SSA.

This reenforcement of evidence necessitates a shift in thinking and action aimed at preventing HIV by: 1. Review article Transactional sex and risk for HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis Joyce Wamoyi§,1, Kirsten Stobeanau2,3, Natalia Bobrova4, Tanya Abramsky4 and Charlotte Watts4 §Corresponding author: Joyce Wamoyi, Department of Sexual and Reproductive Health, National Institute for Medical Research, Mwanza by: Get this from a library.

Schooling, wealth, risky sexual behavior, and HIV/Aids in Sub-Saharan Africa. [Adrienne M Lucas; Nicholas Wilson; National Bureau of Economic Research,] -- Economic growth and development have improved human health in many regions, while sub-Saharan Africa continues to lag behind.

Economic theory and the existing empirical evidence suggest that. The debate on the link between poverty and HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa has continued for almost two decades without definite consensus.

A large body of literature in the early years of the HIV epidemic indicated that relative wealth was associated with a higher risk of HIV infection [ 1, Cited by: That poverty acts as an underlying driver of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has become a common refrain in the global health field.

1, 2 Scholars and activists have assumed that because Africa is on average the poorest continent on earth, then it must be the poorest people who are disproportionately vulnerable to contracting HIV and subsequently Cited by:. Similar research in the area of HIV/AIDS in poor countries is more limited, but the IMAGE project in South Africa is the most rigorous study of the association between interventions and changes in behaviours associated with HIV transmission.

It is a sound example of the way in which interventions alter structural circumstances, lead to increased hope and therefore improved health and wellbeing Cited by: the extensive spreading of HIV-1 infection.

Indeed, heterosexual intercourse is the largest contributor to new HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. The least Lau and Muula: HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa Croat Med J ; Table 1. Population and population-HIV-infected statistics in Africa File Size: KB.A study of the association of HIV infection with wealth in sub-Saharan Africa Keyphrases demographic health sub-saharan africa hiv infection.